Friday, February 27, 2009

Papa Don't Preach

The British government is encouraging parents to, well, not parent.
From Times Online:
    Parents should avoid trying to convince their teenage children of the difference between right and wrong when talking to them about sex, a new government leaflet is to advise.

    Instead, any discussion of values should be kept "light" to encourage teenagers to form their own views, according to the brochure, which one critic has called "amoral".

    Talking to Your Teenager About Sex and Relationships will be distributed in pharmacies from next month as part of an initiative led by Beverley Hughes, the children’s minister.

    The leaflet comes in the wake of the case of Alfie Patten, the 13-year-old boy from East Sussex who fathered a child with a 15-year-old girl and sparked a debate about how to cut rates of teenage parenthood.

    It advises: "Discussing your values with your teenagers will help them to form their own. Remember, though, that trying to convince them of what's right and wrong may discourage them from being open."
You know it's a bad idea when the so-called "experts" start weighing in with their support:
    Linda Blair, a clinical psychologist, said educating older children and teenagers about sex had to be a process of negotiation. "We do not know what is right and wrong; right and wrong is relative, although your child does need clear guidelines," she said.
So, if you hate your children, go ahead and heed their advice and refuse to teach them right from wrong. It really is the least you could do.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

How sad this is.. "right and wrong is relative". Just another perfect example of Romans 1... suppression of the truth. May the Lord continue to freely shed His grace upon His own, save His people and build His church.

willohroots said...

Then Linda Blair's head spun around,,,,
to give advice like that is proof she needs an exorcist.

Samuel D. Smith said...

Yikes. When will we get the same?

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