Friday, December 14, 2012

This Week in Calvinism - December 14, 2012

  • Catholic John Zmirak mulls over the issue of salvation. He isn't really sure about much, but he seems pretty sure the "monstrousness of the Calvinist God" is responsible for turning people away from the faith.

  • "While Calvinism is not formally irrational, it is emotionally irrational." C. Michael Patton explains.

  • A brief look at Evangelistic Calvinism: Why the Doctrines of Grace Are Good News, by John Benton.

  • It has been my experience that those who are the most vehement in opposing Calvinism tend to be the most insistent in denying original sin. That's why we see statements like this: "Jesus did not have a sinful nature, so neither did we. Jesus lived a holy and sinless life and Jesus said come and follow me and He is our example to follow. ... The perfection that God requires is a perfection that we are capable of."

  • I ran across a Facebook page entitled The Errors of Calvinism. The following was posted: "This idea of free choice is woven throughout the scripture. Though God is sovereign, he has relegated his creation into the hands of humanity. Feel free to list your example." There are no examples listed yet.

  • The Seeking Disciple may disagree with my Calvinism, but he doesn't think I worship a false god. Thanks, brother!

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

It seemes to me that Genesis 4:4-7, and Hebrews 11:4 destroy the doctrine unconditional election. Both Cain and Able had the choice to meet Gods requierment for forgivness but only Able accepted.

Lee Shelton said...

What happened with Cain and Able was part of God's plan, was it not?

Harry said...

No! Was it God's plan that Adam and Eve sin?

Lee Shelton said...

Unless you believe God was caught off-guard, then, yes, it was part of his plan. The fact that we were chosen in Christ before the foundation of the world (Eph. 1:4) means that God's plan of salvation existed before Adam and Eve.

Anonymous said...

Let us go back to Genesis 4:4-7. God clearly offers Cain the opportunity to be accepted as righteous. God is completely disingenuous with Cain if he is unable to choose to do right. According to Calvinist doctrine Cain is either totally depraved or unconditionally elected. Is God playing games with Cain, with us, or is He giving Cain the opportunity to exercise free will choice to obey His requirements for righteousness?

Lee Shelton said...

Cain did exactly what Cain wanted to do.

Anonymous said...

Of course he did just like you and I do. According to Calvinist doctrine Cain is either totally depraved or unconditionally elected. Cain is obviously one of the "totally depraved" as evidenced by his choice. So why did God give Cain the opportunity to be accepted?

Anonymous said...

Lee, tell me what you think the meaning of the account given in Gensis 4:4-7 is for you and me?

Lee Shelton said...

The meaning is the same as it was then. If we repent and turn from our sin, we will be forgiven. I think what you're getting at is that you don't understand why Calvinists claim that the gospel is freely offered to all if only an elect group is predestined to respond. However, what amazes me is why a just and holy God would even bother to show mercy on any rebellious sinner at all.

Anonymous said...

It is called mercy and grace. I did not think you had real answer to the scripture. Just trying to help you see the truth. It is not my opinion the scriptures speak for themselves. You never answered why God offered Cain an opportunity to be accepted when it is obvious by Calvinist doctrine he was unable to do so.

Lee Shelton said...

Grace and mercy would be meaningless if the ultimate decision were up to us. What you are suggesting is that salvation that wasn't made sure but was only made possible.

Our will isn't free because it has been affected by sin. We are, in a sense, free to do what we want, but we only want to follow our sinful desires. That's why scripture says that the no one is righteous or seeks after God (Romans 3:10-11). It also says that apart from Christ we are enslaved to sin (Romans 6:6) and dead in our trespasses (Ephesians 2:1). If it were possible for a dead man to raise himself, you might have a point.

However, the gospel is freely offered to all. The opportunity God gave Cain is the same opportunity given to all. The problem is with sinful man, not with God.

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